Partner visa

Partner Visa Application Process (Partner visa 820 / Partner visa Australia)

Getting your own Australian Partner Visa sorted is no easy task. It is a confusing and tumultuous process, so stressing about your Partner Visa is understandable. Well lucky you! Today I will be shedding some light on this difficult process. Right, first things first. In order to be ELIGIBLE to apply for a Partner Visa, you have to be either;

  • Married to

OR

  • In a defacto relationship

with Australian Citizen, Australian Permanent resident or Eligible New Zealand Citizen at the time of applying.

partner visa married coupleFor those of you thinking about applying for a Partner Visa in Australia, you should know that you may not be entitled to work (or study) in the country immediately, except if the previous Visa already stated you could. As soon as your previous Visa ceases to be applicable, your Partner Visa application with Bridging Visa A OR Bridging Visa B could possibly be eligible to work or study in Australia. Once the time has come and you’ve been granted that temporary Partner Visa, you will be able to immediately begin working and studying in good old Oz. The only problem is that you can’t apply for any sort of fee assistance, such as HELP or Newstart, or government subsidy until you have been granted that hallowed permanent Partner Visa (subclass 100 or 801).

Just to make sure – you know that instead of dealing with a ton of documents you can make us a call and we’ll do the hard job for you, right?

As I said before, the Partner Visa process is a long and arduous one, which can take many months, sometimes years and is  separated into a two-stage process, BUT you apply for both the temporary AND permanent Partner Visa at the same time using the form titled 47SP Application for Migration to Australia by a Partner.” Long name I know. Apparently, the Australian government isn’t very creative. There are several ways you can lodge these applications, the most popular are by post or online. Lodging online is “easy”! Simply:

  • Create or Login to your ImmiAccount and select form 47SP.
  • Once the form has been submitted, your sponsor then uses your TRN to submit THEIR 40SP Sponsorship Form for a Partner to Migrate to Australia.
  • Remember to provide all the relevant documents that they require or you will have to go through this process all over again!
  • Pay the Partner Visa Application Charge when you lodge your forms (don’t get scared once you’ll see how much does it cost)

If you opt to lodge your forms by post instead (a dying trend) or in person (even more so), then:

  • Go to the department’s website
  • Download the 47SP application form.
  • Submit application form 47SP, form 47A (if applicable to your situation) form 40SP (which should be completed by your sponsor), and any other supporting documentation required.
  • Include the Visa Application Charge (or any evidence that it has been paid).
  • Lodge the package at your nearest center or post it to the provided address.

If you manage to meet the long list of ‘initial criteria’, then you will be granted a temporary Partner Visa. This temporary Partner Visa will remain valid until a decision is made on your permanent Partner Visa application. This usually takes two years, but it has been known to take longer. I know someone who has been waiting four years!  So if you continue to meet all the legal requirements, and have provided all the additional information required, then the day will finally come when you are granted that ever elusive permanent Partner Visa. Now let’s take a look at the eligibility requirements for that Partner Visa!

Remember – we are here to help. so if you prefer for let a professional do the hard job – let us know and we’ll take care of your visa process, otherwise – get ready for all the fun and continue reading.

Partner Visa Eligibility Requirements

As mentioned earlier, there are two ways to be eligible for a Partner Visa. They are on the basis of a de facto relationship, or a de jure relationship (married). Fancy words huh?

De Jure Relationship (married)

In Australia, if you want to apply for a Partner Visa on the basis of marriage then you need to be legally married to your partner (which in most cases should be your sponsor). If you apply OUTSIDE of Australia on the grounds of marriage then you need to either:

  • Be already married to your partner at the time you apply

OR

  • Intend to legally marry your partner in the near future (usually before a decision is made regarding your temporary Partner Visa)

The good news is that if you were already married in a country that wasn’t Australia, and the marriage is legally binding and valid in that country, then it is generally recognized as a valid marriage under Australian law. However the exceptions are:

  • Same-sex marriages
  • Underage marriages
  • Polygamous marriages

These are marriages that are not permitted within Australia. If you need some more information regarding what marriages are recognized in Oz, then you can visit the Attorney-General’s Department website at www.ag.gov.au.

There are also a few more eligibility requirements that we need to discuss. In order to be eligible for a Partner Visa, on the basis of your marriage, you have to:

  • be sponsored by an eligible person
  • be legally married to your partner (who is usually your sponsor)
  • show that you and your partner have a mutual commitment to a shared life as husband and wife to the exclusion of all others
  • show that you have a genuine and continuing relationship with your partner
  • show that you and your partner are living together or, if not, that any separation is only temporary

AND

  • meet health character requirements

If you got that far reading, it surely means you appreciate what’s here. If for some reason you did not follow us on a facebook yet, now is the time to click “like” button. If you already did, thank you and congratulations for being such a great companion!

De Facto Relationships

There’s a little catch when applying for a de facto Partner Visa. That is you have to have been in a relationship with your partner for at least 12 months BEFORE you can lodge an application. This also needs to be proved.  Once you meet this criterion, then there are a few more factors that you must consider. You must:

  • be sponsored by an eligible person (usually your partner)
  • not be related by family
  • be together with your de facto partner
  • be aged at least 18 years at the time your application is made
  • show that you and your partner have a mutual commitment to a shared life to the exclusion of all others
  • show that you have a genuine and continuing relationship with your partner
  • show that you and your partner have been in a de facto relationship for the entire 12 months immediately prior to lodging your application
  • show that you and your partner are living together or (and if not, that any separation is only temporary)
  • meet health and character requirements

When it comes to deciding upon a de facto relationship, the immigration department gets right up into your business. They look at all sorts of things and require evidence, such as living together full time, sharing important financial and social commitments, and setting up a household separately from other people. Next, let’s take a look at what you need to provide with your Partner Visa application!

 What to Provide With Your Partner Visa Application. Australian Partner visa checklist.

Let’s make this spouse visa checklist! Just so we can be 100% sure that every document and item is covered for you Partner Visa, we are going to go into what you need to provide with your application. Remember, if you mess up your application then you may have to pay another fee when you lodge again. That and the wait will be even longer. With that said, you must provide:

  • a certified copy of the registry extract showing details of your marriage (if you are married, obviously). Just remember that the immigration department does NOT accept the decorative marriage certificate as acceptable evidence. Anyone can make one of those. If you were married overseas then you will need to contact the relevant authority to request your registry. If you need to find any Australian birth, death, or marriage certificates, they are available from the Australian Government website at www.australia.gov.au

OR

  • evidence that you and your partner are in a de facto relationship for the at least 12 months as described earlier. You may be happy to know that there are many compassionate circumstances where permanent Partner Visas have been granted despite not being in a de facto relationship for a full 12 months at the time of lodging.

If you are a Partner Migration Visa applicant then you must also provide the following:

  • The completed 47SP Application for Migration to Australia by a Partner
  • The completed 40SP Sponsorship for a Partner to Migrate to Australia (which is usually your spouse) (completed by your sponsor). As mentioned previously, you can lodge these online, in a post, or in person. Remember to use your ImmiAccount when lodging online or use the department’s website to download the forms.
  • A completed 956 Advice by a Migration Agent/Exempt Person of Providing Immigration Assistance (if you have an appointed, authorized agent)
  • A completed 956A Appointment or Withdrawal of an Authorized Recipient (if you have an agent who is not a migration agent/exempt person)
  • 4 recent passport-size photographs of yourself (or 2 if you are in Australia), and 2 passport-size photographs of your sponsor (again, this is usually your wife)
  • Certified copies of your passport or travel documents
  • Proof of identity
  • Evidence that your relationship is genuine and continuing
  • Proof that your sponsor is an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen who is aged 18 years or over
  • Statutory declarations from 2 people who are Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents and who support your claim that the relationship is genuine and continuing
  • Certified copy of divorce certificate OR death certificate for each previous marriage (if you are married)
  • Completed health and character checks (if this is needed)
  • You must pay the Visa Application Charge (as mentioned above)

I told you when you started reading that this is an arduous process. Unfortunately, the fun doesn’t stop there. If you are planning to include dependent children or any other dependent family members in your application, then you’re going to have to provide:

  • A 47A Details of Child or Other Dependent Family Member Aged 18 Years or Over form for each dependent child 18 years or over. You can find this available to download from the immigration department’s website

 and these must be completed and signed by YOU, YOUR PARTNER, and YOUR DEPENDENT.

  • 4 recent passport-size photographs (or 2 if you are applying in Australia)
  • Certified copies of passports or travel documents
  • Certified copies of birth certificates (or the family book showing names of both parents)
  • Custody documents or a statutory declaration from the child’s other parent giving permission for them to migrate
  • Evidence that the signature on the statutory declaration is the signature of that parent, or if your previous partner died, certified copy of their death certificate
  • For other dependent relatives, evidence that they have been dependent on you for at least the last 12 months
  • Completed health and character checks (if applicable)

AND

  • Aan Australian National Police Check or overseas police certificate(s) from the sponsor (if the dependent is under 18 years of age).

With this helpful Australian partner visa checklist, there is no possibility that your application will be rejected due to incorrect administration!

Partner Migration Temporary Partner Visa (partner visa 309 and partner visa 820)

Lastly, I thought I would finish up with a few technical clauses and notes for when you apply for a Partner Migration Temporary Partner Visa Sub Class 309 and 820. If you lodge your Partner Visa outside Australia, and you are outside at the time of your application, then you need to still be OUTSIDE Australia when the temporary Partner Visa Subclass 309 is granted. Failure to heed this will result in your application being denied.

However, if you manage to lodge your Partner Visa application in Australia, and you are in Australia at the time of your application, then you MUST BE IN Australia when the temporary Partner Visa 820 is granted. Again, failure to heed this will result In your application being denied.

If you manage to secure that temporary Partner Visa then you will have permission to travel to and from Australia until a decision is made on your permanent visa application. You will also be able to finally work and study in Australia. During the 2 year period after making your initial Partner Visa application, you will then be assessed by the immigration department for the permanent Partner Visa (SubClass 100 or 801). If you have been finally been granted a temporary Partner Visa, but lo and behold you now have a dependent child who wishes to migrate (hey life doesn’t care about your plans). He or she wasn’t included in your Partner Visa since you know, they didn’t exist. You can find more information on child dependents here. If you change your address, which is bound to happen more than once, or your circumstances change (and they most definitely will), then you should immediately notify the office or agent that is handling your application.

 Permanent Partner Visa (Sub Classes 100 and 801)

To receive the grant for the permanent Partner Visa Sub Classes 100 and 801, whether you are in or outside Australia has no bearing whatsoever. The reason for this is that permanent residence can’t be granted less than 2 years from when you first lodge your application. If you simply cannot wait the entire 2 year period, you may be granted a permanent Partner Visa if:

  • at the time you apply, you have been in a partner relationship with your partner for 3 years or more, or 2 years or more if you and your partner have a dependent child of your relationship
  • your partner holds or held a permanent humanitarian visa and you were in the relationship before the visa was granted and this relationship was declared to the department at the time (applies to subclass 100 visas only).

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Evidence to provide with your partner visa application (not only for partner visa 820)

Proof of Identity/Personal Documents

After talking about the Partner Visa process, I thought I would delve a little more into what kind of evidence you should provide with your application. Not one to settle for just the application and being done with it, the Immigration Department needs evidence too. I mean, they can’t exactly take your word for it now can they? So in addition to your Partner Visa application, you must not only provide documentary evidence of your identification AND background, you must provide evidence that your relationship is a genuine and continuing one.

Your sponsor also needs to provide the same, exact proof and if you have dependants, you must also provide the required documentation along with your initial application. I understand that you may not be able to provide ALL the documents that they require but unfortunately, I’m not 100% sure how lenient the Immigration Department is, and what concessions they are allowed to make. I’m sure it is definitely on a case by case basis, unique to every applicant. My advice is to have a chat with your local agent or their office explaining your problem. It is 110% in your BEST interests to support your application with as much paperwork as you can manage. It will speed up the process, and also avoid you having to start over again. Please don’t forget that any and all documents you provide will need to be in the form of certified copies (this is because the immigration department won’t be sending your documents back).

The Applicant

As the applicant, you will need to provide certified copies of a number of documents and evidence. I have taken the liberty of listing what is required for you. You will need:

  • A certificate of birth showing both parents’ names (OR a Baptism certificate, passport, family tree clearly labeling both parents’ names, government issued identity forms or document issued by a court that verifies your identity)
  • Evidence of any name changes (deed polls, marriage certificates, divorce certificates)
  • Your current passport or proof of travel (and all your previous passports or proof of travel)
  • Certified copies of your military service record or discharge papers (if applicable)

The Applicant’s Dependents

As dependants for the applicant, certified copies of a number of documents and evidence are required. I have taken the liberty yet again of listing what is required. You will need:

  • A birth certificate showing both parents’ names (OR a Baptism certificate, passport, family book showing both parents’ names, identity document issued by the government, or document issued by a court that verifies your identity)
  • Evidence of any name changes (deed polls, marriage certificates, divorce certificates)
  • Their current passports/travel documents (and all their previous passports or travel documents)
  • Certified copies of their military service record or discharge papers (if applicable)
  • Any custody documents (adoption certificates, court orders)
  • Their previous marriage registry extracts or a copy of the divorce decree absolute, annulment papers, OR the death certificate of the deceased spouse (if applicable)

As the Partner Migration Visa Sponsor, you will need to provide certified copies of a number of documents and evidence. I have taken the liberty of listing what is required for you. You will need:

  • Evidence of your sponsor’s status (birth certificate, Australian passport/foreign passport, proof of residency, New Zealand citizenship, passport pages)

AND

  • Evidence of any name changes your sponsor had (if applicable, deed poll, previous marriage registry extracts, divorce certificates)

Proof Your Relationship is Legitimate

It feels like I’m saying it over and over but when you lodge an application for a Partner Visa, you absolutely MUST provide any and all evidence you have available, to support your legitimate and true claim. Since the technical links and information is a bit hard to swallow (in other words understand), I have taken all the important points and listed them quite nicely for you below.

Your Relationship History. Statutory declaration partner visa applicant.

Both of you must provide a statement about history of your relationship, and you have to include the following:

  • Describe your first meeting
  • Describe how your relationship blossomed
  • When he or she popped the question, or chose to live and share your lives together
  • Describe the many details of your relationship, like how you stand for one another both in terms of finances, through emotions, and in health.
  • Mention any times that you and your partner were separated, the duration of these separations, and how you kept the relationship going during these separations.)
  • Any future plans you have together

Although you can create these statements on any ordinary writing paper, but you should opt to use a statutory declaration. Each page of the paper OR declaration MUST be signed and dated by the author.

 Evidence of Your Relationship

As mentioned before, there are four different categories that are required for you to provide evidence. They are:

  • Financial aspects
  • Nature of the household
  • Social context of the relationship
  • Nature of your commitment to each other

 We know that all relationships are different and unique, so obviously everyone will have a different story. Just try remembering to provide as much evidence as possible (see above) to support any claims you have.  As the lists I have given you are just guidelines, try to include everything that you think would help. Ask your agent if you are unsure.

Financial Aspects

The financial aspect relating to this section of the evidence process is one trying to prove that you guys share your finances (true relationships work this way people). You will be required to submit evidence of:

  • Do you both own any real estate of other assets that are in your names? Like cars and appliances? Or do you both share any liabilities such as insurance?
  • How do you split or pool your finances?
  • Have you engaged with any legal obligations, on the basis of being a couple?
  • Do you both have any shared accounts in your current banks or documents to prove something like this?
  • How do you both split or take care of the bills and multiple expenses?

Household Nature Proof

With the next requirement, you will be asked to provide evidence that you guys share responsibilities. You will be required to submit evidence of:

  • Our shared accommodation arrangements
  • Details providing the shared responsibility for home duties and how they are allocated.
  • Do you have your lease or mortgage in both your names?
  • Electricity, gas, telephone shared accounts
  • Who pays the bills/living expenses and how are they divided?
  • If you both have children, do you have any custody agreements together?
  • Any and all documents that clearly state you AND your partner reside at the same address.

 Relationship’s Social Circles

The third item in the process of evidence gathering relies on the social aspect of your relationship. You will be required to evidence that:

  • You and your partner are socially accepted by peers, friends, and family as a socially legitimate couple. Do you have proof of invitations in both your names? Friend outings? Anyone in common with other friends and family?
  • You have documents from different government institutions/authorities
  • You have statements and declarations concerning previous requirements from family, friends and colleagues/acquaintances
  • You and your partner are members of gyms, sports groups, and other group activities.
  • You and your partner both take part in any cultural and/or social functions and groups.
  • You have both traveled abroad or interstate together as a couple.

Proving Your Commitment To One Another

The last section requires you to provide evidence regarding your commitment that you and your partner have made to one another. You will need to provide evidence based on:

  • How well you know one another regarding every personal, minute detail
  • Proof of how far you two are willing to integrate your lives together and how far in you have both gone already
  • What both of your wills state
  • Documents and proof regarding phone accounts or letters/emails showing that contact was kept during your period of separation.

How To Prove Your Relationship Is On The Level

So we’ve discussed a few items regarding your application and what is needed for the Partner Visa, and one of the requirements was that you had to provide evidence that your relationship is genuine. According to the Australian Department of Immigration, Partner Visa relationship evidence constitutes for approx. 70% of all applications they deal with. It can still be quite a complicated process so I thought I’d run you through how to effectively prove your relationship, and what EXACTLY is needed. Before I begin, you can find all the technical information I am about to explain on the DIBP website here.

 Let me break this down for you. You will need:

  • A statement from the sponsor and applicant regarding the nature of their relationship. This means you need to describe your lives together including as many DETAILS as you can give. Try to aim for a few pages; don’t write a novel about your life!
  • Witness statements on Form 888. This is a declaration completed by a witness relating to the Partner Visa. Remember, you will need a minimum of 2. Solid advice is to choose a few witnesses who are citizens of Australia (first) and then opt for statements from PR’s and non-residents. Your relatives are also the one’s who should be approached to provide with the statement.
  • Certificate of marriage and/or Certificate of Relationship Registration (if this applies to you).

Now we know that every relationship is different, so the second section of providing evidence gets a little bit tricky. In order to make things easier, the Department of Immigration has released a guideline as to what they accept as proof.

As per specifications at Migration Regulation 1.09A, you have to provide evidence that your relationship is genuine. That is that it is a continuing, and mutually exclusive (ahem, what?) commitment to share your lives together. I’ve taken the liberty of extracting some examples from Migration Regulation 1.09A to further assist the process.

What is the Extent of Your Commitment to Each Other?

  • Do you both have any real estate or any other assets that are in your combined names?
  • Do you both have any liabilities that are in your combined names?
  • How do you manage finances and pool them together?
  • What is the extent on all of your shared home expenses?

 Household Nature

  • Do you both have to care for and support any children?
  • What are your living arrangements?
  • What are your responsibilities for your home duties? How do you share these?

How Do Others Describe Your Relationship?

  • Can you provide any feedback or references from friends, colleagues or acquaintances?
  • Are you planning and/or taking part in any kind of social groups or functions?
  • Can you provide any proof of how you represent yourselves to other people?

Gauging Your Commitments to One Another

  • How long has the relationship been going on?
  • To what extent do you and your companion draw emotional support from one another?

 Still with me so far? Fantastic! In this next part, you have three important things that are imperative to remember.

  1. If or when you apply for a de facto relationship, you have to provide evidence of your shared history and living situation for a minimum of 12 months. You’ll want to provide evidence for the entire relationship period, but 1 year is the bare minimum required.
  2. Married couples need to supply evidence that supports the entirety of your marriage. Say you have both been with each other for 5 years, but were only married the last 2 then try to provide as much evidence to prove you were de facto those last few years.
  3. The Department of Immigration needs YOU to paint the picture for THEM! Remember to provide everything you need as this will speed up the process.

Now the problem is that there is no one, specific way to do this. The answers for everyone will differ accordingly. You managed to tell your tale and provided all the required paperwork, including the witness statements (888), and possibly your marriage certificate. You now have 3 different pieces of evidence for your relationship. So now have a think about if there is anyone else that can provide evidence of your relationship. Use any and all ways to prove your relationship.

Examples of documents to support your partner visa 820 application

Don’t use it as a partner visa checklist as not all of these documents will apply to your particular situation, but this list covers the most popular one’s which might be considered by the department as a proof of your relationship.

  • Remember your emergency contacts and next of kin.
  • You will have certainly told government institutions of your relationship, like the ATO or even your Super fund.
  • Any joint accounts? Bank, Electricity, Gas, Lease, Mortgage, Insurance?
  • Websites and accounts from social media, where you have mentioned a long time ago you are in a relationship with your partner? (Facebook, Twitter)
  • Any visual records like photos or websites?
  • Have you been apart from each other? If so, explain your methods of staying in touch? (Email, Skype, SMS)
  • Have you bought anything in both of your names? Provide receipts.
  • Do you have any mail or documents that prove you live together?
  • Are you both members of any association? Provide membership cards.
  • Do you present celebratory letters, cards or gifts on celebratory occasions? Provide receipts and proof. (Valentine’s Day, Birthdays, Anniversaries)

To further increase your chances of NOT screwing this up, I’ve also taken the liberty to provide some of the financial aspects of a Join Statutory Declaration, i.e- what the Immigration Department accepts.

  • Original letters of joint bank accounts
  • Relevant purchases made for before/during a trip
  • Flights booked for your trips
  • Room bookings made for your trips
  • Bank statements of applicant showing all purchases made since the relationship started
  • Bank statements of sponsor showing all purchases made since the relationship started
  • Joint Statutory Declaration stating a summary of the Nature of your Household
  • does-it-really-apply-to-my-partner-visaStatutory Declaration from landlord stating rental lease
  • Confirmation emails for household purchases
  • Applicant proof of address living with sponsor in Australia
  • Joint Statutory Declaration of the Social Aspect of our Relationship
  • Photos of applicant and sponsor together, and with friends every month and every country visited if traveled together
  • Joint cards from applicant’s and sponsor’s families
  • Personal cards to and from the applicant and sponsor
  • Photos of Applicant & Sponsor with both families
  • Photo evidence of gifts to and from the applicant and sponsor
  • Email confirmation of gifts to and from the applicant and sponsor
  • Gig tickets confirmation
  • Joint gym memberships
  • Screenshots of mutual friends on social media
  • Cards from friends to applicant
  • Postcards of applicant’s and sponsor’s trips to sponsor’s relative
  • Personal emails between the applicant, sponsor, and sponsor’s relative
  • Personal emails between the applicant and applicant’s relative
  • Joint Statutory Declaration of our Nature of Commitment to each other
  • Certified certificate of Births, Deaths & Marriages
  • Screenshots of proof that applicant and sponsor are each other’s beneficiaries for their Super funds
  • Applicant’s application form for working for a company stating sponsor as the emergency contact
  • Evidence that applicant’s second year Working Holiday Visa was approved and sent to sponsor’s email for confirmation.
  • Leaving cards, emails, and postcards sent to each other whilst applicant went to and from overseas.
  • Facebook status screenshots showing when applicant and sponsor made their relationship official on social media
  • Private Facebook conversations between sponsor and applicant
  • Emotional support emails and cards to each other
  • Applicant’s and sponsor’s joint website if you ran the blog.
  • Proof of applicant’s and sponsor’s wills.

And so the list goes on and on but hopefully, you got everything you needed out of the options I listed above. By themselves none of these items actually prove anything, but as a whole, they provide some pretty damning evidence that even the Immigration Department can dismiss.

How to get away with a 12-month requirement for Defacto relationship. 

As previously described, when applying for a Partner Visa on the basis of a de facto relationship, you need to provide proof that your relationship has been a minimum of 12 months. This cohabitation requirement also extends to the following types of Visas:

  • Permanent Visas
  • Business Skills (Provisional)
  • Student Visas
  • General Skilled Migration Visas

However the good news is that if you register your relationship in Australia, you are actually exempt from the 12 month requirement (but you still need to prove that you are living together). The benefit of registering as a de facto relationship means that you are legally recognized as a couple under state law. Now the usual requirements to register for a de facto relationship include:

  • Both partners being 18 years or over
  • Must not be in a relationship as a couple with another person (married, in a defacto relationship or in a registered relationship)
  • Must not be related by family (hopefully this is common sense)
  • Same sex and transgender couples are allowed to register

You can register in almost any state of Australia, but there are some main requirements (I know, more) for each state. I’ve provided the links below for the corresponding states. Have a look depending on where you are located.

NSW – Registered relationship under s.4, Relationships Register Act 2010

Victoria – Registered Relationship under s.10(3)(a) of Relationships Act 2008

QLD – Civil Partnership under s.5 of Civil Partnerships Act 2011

Tasmania – Significant Relationship under s.4 of Relationships Act 2003

ACT – Civil Partnership under s.6 of Civil Partnerships Act 2008

Western Australia (WA)-

The funny thing about WA is, if you are resident then you can register your de facto relationship but it is not recognized for migration purposes.

South Australia (SA)-

Unfortunately, registration is not available here.

Northern Territory (NT)

Unfortunately, registration is not available here.

Applicants using this option need to be aware of (even more) criteria that apply in the many different states. Some have a lot of different requirements, while some only have a few that have changed. It is YOUR responsibility to find out what is what (please see above links). The relationship registration process makes it possible to lodge with a shorter period of cohabitation than would otherwise be the case, just keep in mind that processing time and residence requirements for Australian states.

Please remember every case is different, and what’s described above is only just the iceberg. There’s way more than that in Australian Migration Law and Regulations. It’s always a good idea to discuss your situation with a Registered Migration Agent, who will assess your chances of getting your Partner Visa granted and will lead you through the whole process. And yes you’re right I might be able to help you out. Just fill the form below and we’ll get back to you.

If you have any questions or would like to share your story – feel free to leave your comment below.

Lastly if you’d like to do everything by yourself this is first-hand experience on how to complete all the documents for partner visa 820:

If you are married to, or in de-facto relationship with an Australian citizen or permanent resident you may be eligible
for a partner visa to enter and remain permanently in Australia.
It is always good to know that Australian government recognizes same-sex relationship.

 

 

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